Len Goodman Illness: From Which Cancer Is He Suffering?

Len Goodman claimed he never wore a hat when playing golf in the sun before he had to have a malignant tumor removed. Len told the Loose Women panel, “I was playing golf, and a man remarked to me, ‘Oh, you’ve got a small mole on your forehead. As he put it, “Just like my nan used to.” We discussed the importance of me getting it checked out. I had no medical background, so I asked, “What is it?”

Len said, “I went, and they removed it, and it’s no longer there.” It was something tiny on my forehead, yet…

“Probably because I don’t wear a hat, which I now do when I play golf,” I said.

It might have been something considerably worse; the 77-year-old acknowledged, so the “small early warning” sign was helpful.

The former dancer’s skin cancer discovery was shocking, but the “easy process” of removal made him very happy.

What is Skin Cancer?

Sun damage is a significant risk factor for the development of skin cancer. This widespread malignancy, however, may develop even in shady parts of the body.

Basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and melanoma are the three most common forms of skin cancer.

Limiting or avoiding exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation can help minimize the risk of skin cancer. Regularly examining your skin for unusual changes is one of the best ways to catch skin cancer in its earliest stages. If skin cancer is detected early, it has a far better chance of being successfully treated.

Symptoms of Skin Cancer?

The scalp, face, lips, ears, neck, chest, arms, and hands, as well as the legs in women, are the most common sites for skin cancer due to exposure to the sun. However, it may also appear in unseen places, such as the palms of your hands, the spaces between your fingers and toes, and the vaginal region.

Those with darker skin tones are not immune to developing skin cancer. Melanoma is more common in parts of the body that are rarely exposed to sunlight, such as the palms and soles, among persons with darker skin tones.

len goodman illness

Skin Cancer: Risk Factors

Some of the things that might put you at risk for skin cancer are:

  • A person with fair skin: Skin cancer may affect people of any skin tone. However, the lack of melanin in the skin makes it more vulnerable to the harmful effects of sunlight. Light-skinned people, those who freckle readily, and those whose hair and eyes are blonde or red are at a considerably higher risk for developing skin cancer than those of darker skin tones.
  • Previous experience with sunburn: One’s chance of acquiring skin cancer as an adult increases if one suffers from blistering sunburns as a child or adolescent. Adults who have had severe sunburns also increase their risk.
  • Too much time in the sun: Without adequate protection from sunscreen and clothes, skin cancer is a real risk for everyone who spends a lot of time outside in the sun. Tanning increases your risk, as does use tanning lights or beds. Tans result from the skin’s protective reaction to sunburn.
  • Locations with lots of sunshine or high elevations: Those lucky enough to call a warm, sunny environment home get greater sun exposure than their northern counterparts. The most excellent sunlight occurs at higher altitudes; thus, residents are likewise subjected to more significant radiation.
  • Moles: There is a higher risk of skin cancer in those with many moles or moles that are aberrant in some way (called dysplastic nevi). These moles are more prone to develop into cancer than conventional moles because of their uneven shape and size. Keep an eye on any moles you know have a history of being atypical.

How to Prevent Skin Cancer?

The majority of cases of skin cancer may be avoided via proper care. Here are some ways to reduce your risk of developing skin cancer:

  • Stay out of direct sunlight during the hottest part of the day: Between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., the sun is directly above many individuals in North America. If you must go outside, do it only during the sunniest parts of the day, even if it is winter or the sky is overcast. Are you safe from the sun’s harmful ultraviolet rays at no time of the year since even clouds provide little protection? If you can, try to stay out of the sun while it’s at its peak, so you don’t get sunburn or tan and raise your risk of skin cancer. Accumulated sun exposure may also contribute to skin cancer.
  • Put on sunscreen daily: Sunscreens don’t provide 100% protection from UV rays, including those that cause melanoma. However, they are an integral part of a comprehensive strategy for preventing sun damage. Even on overcast days, you should use sunscreen with at least a 30 sun protection factor (SPF). You should put on plenty of sunscreens and reapply them every two hours, or more frequently if you’re going to be outside in the sun for an extended period. Protect your lips, ears, hands, and neck by applying sunscreen liberally.
  • Take precautions by donning safety gear: There is still some exposure to harmful UV radiation even after sunscreen. You should wear dark, closely woven clothing that protects your arms and legs and a hat with a wide brim rather than a baseball cap or visor. Photo-safe apparel is also available from several retailers. A dermatologist can advise you on the best brand for your needs. Sunglasses are an absolute must. Find a pair that protects against ultraviolet A and ultraviolet B rays.
  • Check your skin often and report changes: You should routinely check for the development of new moles, freckles, lumps, and birthmarks, as well as the progression of preexisting ones. Examine your face, neck, ears, and scalp in the mirror. Check your upper and lower back arms and hands, and chest for any signs of illness or injury. Check your inner and outer thighs, the soles, and between your toes of both feet. Remember to examine the region between your legs and genitalia as well.
  • Check your skin often and report changes: You should routinely check for the development of new moles, freckles, lumps, and birthmarks, as well as the progression of preexisting ones. Examine your face, neck, ears, and scalp in the mirror. Check your upper and lower back arms and hands, and chest for any signs of illness or injury. Check your inner and outer thighs, the soles, and between your toes of both feet. Remember to examine the region between your legs and genitalia as well.

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