Senate Approves Same-Sex Multiracial Marriage

Senate Approves Same-Sex Multiracial Marriage: In a historic and unanimous vote on Tuesday, the Senate passed the Respect for Marriage Act, a piece of legislation that would safeguard marriages between people of different races and sexual orientations. The final tally was 61 to 36 in favor.

Senate Passes Landmark Same-Sex and Multiracial Marriage Measure

In a historic and unanimous vote on Tuesday, the Senate passed the Respect for Marriage Act, a piece of legislation that would safeguard marriages between people of different races and sexual orientations. The final tally was 61 to 36 in favor. Twelve Republicans, the same twelve Republican members who supported the measure for a procedural vote earlier this month, voted in favor of the bill. All of the members of the Democratic caucus voted in favor of the bill.

It is now up to the House to decide whether or not to pass the bill, after which it will be delivered to Vice President Joe Biden to be signed into law. It is anticipated that the law will be approved by the House of Representatives before the end of the year, potentially as soon as the next week.

“This legislation will safeguard the rights and protections to which LGBTQI+ and interracial couples and their children are entitled,” Vice President Joe Biden said in a statement Tuesday evening after the bill was passed by the Senate. He hailed the bill as a “bipartisan achievement.” “For millions of Americans, this legislation will safeguard the rights and protections to which LGBTQI+ and interracial couples and their children are entitled,” Biden said.

The law would not establish a nationwide mandate that all states legalize marriage between people of the same gender; but, it would oblige individual states to recognize the legal marriages that have taken place in other jurisdictions.

Therefore, if the Supreme Court might decide to reverse its decision from 2015 in the case of Obergefell v. Hodges, which legalized marriage between people of the same sexual orientation, a state could still pass a law to ban marriage between people of the same sexual orientation; however, that state would be required to recognize a same-sex marriage from another state.

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Senate Approves Same-Sex Multiracial Marriage
Earlier this month, the proposal was successful in overcoming a significant procedural obstacle when the Senate voted 62 to 37 to end a filibuster. In a previous statement, the group of senators from both parties — Republicans Rob Portman of Ohio, Susan Collins of Maine, and Thom Tillis of North Carolina, and Democrats Tammy Baldwin of Wisconsin and Kyrsten Sinema of Arizona — said that they were “looking forward to this legislation coming to the floor.”

During a speech on the Senate floor on Tuesday morning, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer praised the “excellent and persistent work” that these five senators had done on the historic piece of legislation. “Today is a really happy day for millions upon millions of people in the United States,” he stated. “A significant day. A day that has been in the making for a very long time.”

The fact that the measure received support from Republicans, including senators from areas with a very conservative political climate, is an indication of how much support for same-sex marriage has risen over the past several years. Republican Senator Cynthia Lummis of Wyoming stated in an interview with CNN’s Manu Raju earlier this month that she voted to advance the Senate’s same-sex marriage measure owing to “Article 1, Section 3 of the Wyoming Constitution,” which she recited to reporters and includes an anti-discrimination clause.

She continued by explaining, “That’s why we’ve dubbed the equality state.”In the meanwhile, Senator Mitt Romney of Utah stated that the “law made sense” and “provides essential protections for religious liberty.”

Romney stated in a statement that while he supports the institution of conventional marriage, persons who identify as LGBTQ have counted on the fact that Obergefell is and always has been the law of the nation. “This measure offers clarity to many members of the LGBTQ community in the United States, and it sends a message that the Congress – and I – hold all of our fellow Americans in the same regard and love them equally.”

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